AI is getting a tryout in pro sports

Last updated: 08-13-2019

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AI is getting a tryout in pro sports

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Why it matters: As the visualization above shows, North Korea is critically reliant on trade with China. That's why experts hope that the latest round of sanctions, including a U.S. threat to block any company or bank that does business with North Korea from using the U.S. financial system, will kickstart negotiations.
According to the United Nations, total trade to and from North Korea was $6.3 billion in 2015. The biggest imports were oil and high-tech products like computers and video displays. North Korea's biggest export were coal and textiles. China dominates this type of trade with North Korea, but it has already cut off coal imports.
As of Jan. 1, China said it will halt natural gas exports to the country, and limit oil shipments to 2 million barrels a day, although it is not clear whether that is an actual reduction in oil sales.
Guest workers: What's more difficult to count is how much North Korea spends and receives for services. This includes remittances from North Korean laborers working in China. There are no public numbers on how many North Koreans are working in China, but estimates range from 19,000 to 100,000 . Much of what these workers are paid ends up back in the pockets of the Kim regime, providing much needed hard currency, and facilitating imports.
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That includes opinions, attitudes, beliefs and moods that aren't written down anywhere, but can be inferred from your online behavior — the posts you like on Facebook, the photos you share, the videos you watch, the items you buy on Amazon, your search queries, your location, etc.
Advances in machine learning, deep learning and neural networks is making it easier to see patterns across raw data. That means otherwise innocuous data points can be combined to derive a revealing look at your life.
"The most valuable data can't be measured in bits," Kearns said Tuesday at an AT&T-hosted privacy event in DC. Companies that have access to this information "can make all kinds of inferences about you and your life circumstances that you may not even know yourself."
Machine learning: Kearns says policymakers need to consult machine learning engineers, who have a detailed view of how data is being linked together. The FTC is interested in including those technologists in its policy discussions and is keeping an eye on developments in the data analytics and artificial intelligence areas, said Maneesh Mithal, associate director of the FTC's Division of Privacy and Identity Protection.
Our thought bubble: Even though a lot of tech and telecom companies say it's in their best interest to be transparent with customers about how their data is used, most people don't have a way to fully understand how their data is being pieced together and what these companies really know about them as a result.That's helping to drive a push for more awareness of data practices, even if privacy regulation — at least in the U.S. — is still pretty far off.
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Between the lines: Many Republicans will tell you the party is better at taxes than health care. Even so, there are a lot of hard, divisive decisions about budget deficits, tax loopholes and special interest carveouts to be made that won't be easy. On top of that, they still want to lay the groundwork for another run at repealing the Affordable Care Act — even if it moves to the back burner for a while.
Context: The ball is really about to get rolling on tax reform. Republicans are being briefed on the framework of the plan today. The Senate Budget Committee is set to mark up the 2018 budget next week, which unlocks the vehicle for a tax bill that needs only 51 votes to pass the Senate.
The catch: The Graham-Cassidy health care bill is dead for now, but Republicans don't want to give up on repeal forever. So they could push to include it in the same budget, giving them more time to pass some version of it with 51 votes.
Here's what Sen. Lindsey Graham said yesterday when Republicans called off the Senate vote: "We're coming back to this after taxes. We're going to have time to explain our concept. We'll have a better process and we're going to take this show on the road."
Senate leadership has said they don't think it's a good idea to throw health care — clearly a volatile issue for the party into the mix. Sen. Roy Blunt is reluctant too, but he told reporters Tuesday that it's “likely" the budget instructions will merge the two.
However, other members of leadership are still trying to prevent it from happening: "Infusing those issues might make it complicated for both," said Sen. John Thune.
Behind the scenes, GOP members, aides and lobbyists believe keeping at health care by mixing it with tax reform is likely an awful idea. Continuing to beat a dead horse is likely only to make tax reform that much harder — or kill it altogether — with a minuscule chance of success.
Consider this: These are the tough decisions Congress already has to make in order to pull off tax reform:
The Senate Budget Committee has to pass a budget, which is likely to allow as much as $1.5 trillion to be added to the deficit through tax reform (not accounting for economic growth).
Graham and Ron Johnson, who are on the committee, have indicated they won't vote for a budget that doesn't pave the way for health care as well. (Though it's unclear whether Graham will still take a hard line on that after his comments yesterday.)
The Senate as a whole has to pass a budget, which will probably come with the same disagreements as in committee, except among more members. Republicans can only lose two votes.
The House and the Senate then have to agree on a budget. The House budget includes instructions for $200 billion in deficit reduction — so somehow that has to be merged with a Senate budget that would allow $1.5 trillion to be added to the deficit.
Plus, the House doesn't want to add health care into the mix.
Then, after all of that is worked out, that's when they get to fight over actual tax policy.
Our thought bubble: A party made desperate by its failure to pull off a key campaign promise is about to step into another major legislative food fight.
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Who's likely in
Regional safety net health plans: "Almost all our plans have filed and are ready to go. But many were waiting to see what happened with Graham-Cassidy before locking in their final answer," said Meg Murray, CEO of the Association for Community Affiliated Plans.
Plans that are part of hospital and doctor systems: Kaiser Permanente CEO Bernard Tyson and Intermountain Healthcare CEO Marc Harrison have relatively large exchange populations, and both have told me somewhat recently they have no intention of bailing.
"Our community-based plans have long recognized the exchange market is not a moneymaker but part of a comprehensive approach to serving an entire community and nation," said Ceci Connolly, head of the Alliance of Community Health Plans.
Who's out
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Amazon's take:
Google made a change today at around 3 pm. YouTube used to be available to our shared customers on Echo Show. As of this afternoon, Google has chosen to no longer make YouTube available on Echo Show, without explanation and without notification to customers. There is no technical reason for that decision, which is disappointing and hurts both of our customers.
Google's take:
We've been in negotiations with Amazon for a long time, working towards an agreement that provides great experiences for customers on both platforms. Amazon's implementation of YouTube on the Echo Show violates our terms of service, creating a broken user experience. We hope to be able to reach an agreement and resolve these issues soon. (per The Verge )
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In response to the fine, Google said it thinks the EU undervalues Google's shopping and search experience for consumers, arguing that its success doesn't mean it favors itself — "it's the result of hard work and constant innovation."
The bigger picture: As Axios has previously reporte d, the bigger concern for Google is that the EU regulators' aggressive measures will nudge U.S. counterparts to take a closer look at whether the dominant tech firms use their growing troves of data and increasingly sophisticated algorithms to skew competition more broadly. Smaller firms like Yelp and have spent several years lobbying the EU to act, as U.S. regulators have been reluctant to take on tech giants — though pressure is growing for them to take a more critical look .


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